This week’s #breakthrough #jobsearchtip is about your outgoing voicemail message. Is it branded to you, or is your mailbox full or not yet setup to receive voice mail?
I recently read a short post by a recruiter trying to get in touch with a potential candidate and instead of hearing a professional greeting when they called the number provided, the individual heard an automated voice that stated, “this voice mailbox is not setup.”
Your resume is beautifully written. You’ve nailed your value proposition on your LinkedIn profile. You have a professional headshot. You’ve locked down your social media accounts, but have you thought about a prospective employer calling your contact number?
Does your outgoing message support your brand image, or does it make everything fall apart?
I ask because, like my recruiter friend, people notice. And, having a voicemail message that reinforces your brand is a powerful opportunity for you to further stand out and gain another strategic advantage in a competitive marketplace.
Here’s what to keep in mind when creating your voicemail message.
• Open with the basics.
• Keep your message short, that’s under 30 seconds.
• Wrap in a bit about yourself,
• and then give a call to action.
As an example, here’s mine.
“Hey there, you’ve reached Tammy Shoup with Breakthrough Resumes. Sorry I missed your call.
If you’re hearing this, then I’m currently writing words that change lives, but I promise to return your call as soon as possible. So please leave your name, number, and a brief message, and we’ll talk soon.
Thank you for calling.
The goal with your voicemail message is to connect. Therefore, it’s important that you confirm that the caller has reached the correct number, that your message is personal and that it gives the caller direction as to their next step.
So, here’s another example.
“You’ve reached Michelle Miller in supply chain management. I can’t take your call right now, but please leave your name and number, and I will get back to you as soon as I can, or you can reach me via
email at mmiller@email.com. Thanks for calling.
In both of these examples,
• there is a confirmation of whom the caller has reached.
• It gives the caller a little bit of background.
For me, it’s writing words that change lives. For the example Michelle, it’s that she’s in
supply chain management.
• And then it asks the caller to take an action, to leave their name and number and a brief message so you have a way to get back in touch with them.
So take the time to continue setting yourself apart by creating a branded voicemail message.
If nothing else, at least make sure your voice mailbox is set up, that it states your name, and asks to caller to leave a message.
This small step can make a big difference in your job search success.